Loving One Another

Posts tagged ‘aging’

Y = Youthfulness


Day #25 in the A-Z series of “What Makes Me Happy?”

YOUTHFULNESS

My time on earth is

Measured by experience

And development

I maintain an attitude of positivity and youthfulness.

The zeal of youth makes me happy.

My spirit is ageless.

How about you?

alley autumn autumn colours autumn leaves

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

My husband said, “Indecision.”

I said, “That’s not a Y, that’s an I.”

He said, “But it’s a Y in the road.  You have indecision.

You don’t know which way to go.

It doesn’t make me happy, but it makes me think.

Thinking/ pondering/weighing odds – those make me happy…

Because it’s nice to have choices.”

 

Hmmm, creative thinking, don’t you think?

 

What “Y” word makes you happy?

Sixty-Four Years


SIXTY-FOUR YEARS
(a heptameter)

man in black shirt

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

No, this “old coot” (who may have a wonderful sense of humor locked inside, by the way) is not sixty-four. He’s much older… and he reminds me of the subject of the poem below.

It’s a seven-syllable poem. I read somewhere, “Seven-syllable lines in English verse can have several different names.” I call mine heptameter. I heard that somewhere. I didn’t make it up.

Seven syllables on each line… a true story here… first published in our
Madison County Writers Anthology for the year. The subject was a 96-year-old for whom I was a senior companion. He was a hoot of an old coot!

Sixty-four Years

a heptameter

 

The poem rings a loneliness bell, doesn’t it? Ah, but he loved company and he had a million stories locked inside, aching to be told.

Do you know a senior who lives alone? Why not decide to visit today – or give him/her a call.

By the way, doing a little research with Siri, I learned that in English poetry, you only count syllables in Haiku (a form borrowed from another language, of course)… not usually in other poetry forms. Other languages, like French, count syllables in most forms of poetry. The reason English poems don’t was explained this way: English is a stress-timed language, and French is a syllable-timed language. This means that in English, the number of stressed syllables in a line is generally more important than the total number of syllables … (and besides, depending upon what part of the country you’re from, the syllables differ … y’all relate, raught?)

Nevertheless, it was fun to write my Heptameter. You should try it. It’s fun!

Remaining Useful


When your hair is sparkling silver

And your chest is wrinkled skin,

How can your life be useful?

How can you keep your grin?

I’ll tell you all my secret –

It’s not too hard to know.

You have to find your niches

And stay useful as you grow.

You can’t let age impale you

And make you feel extinct.

You have to keep on growing

And keep your life distinct!

So find out where your passions

Lead you to volunteer –

And soon skin and hair tone

Will bring you cause to cheer!

It’s only when we’ve given

A life of service sincere

That we can join the chorus

In a heartfelt round of cheer.

We must resolve to remain useful.

We must share our time with glee.

Then the outer image fades away,

And our joy is all they see!

95 Years of Life Lessons


Living Fully Every Day

fullsizeoutput_5563

My 95 years young friend, Carol, was in the hospital. Her face lit up when I walked in. It was a joy to see her. We chatted about her recent birthday, the family who came from far and near to celebrate with her, and about my trip this year to visit our daughter and grandkids in Switzerland. I shared that one of my grandsons may come to live with us for a time – and how Bob & I look forward to sharing life with him for awhile.

I told Carol, “With eight decades of living under our belts, we find joy in sharing some of the pearls of wit and wisdom we’ve picked up along the path.”

I asked Carol if she would share some of her life lessons with me. I don’t think I was prepared for the depth of her sharing. But, as soon as she began, I knew I was in for a treat. I grabbed a paper and pen and asked her if she would mind if I took notes. Carol used to be a writer, too … but she finds it hard to set pen to paper these days. So, knowing I love to write, she grinned widely, and nodded.

“Here are some things I have learned as I’ve grown older:

  1. Life softens.
  2. Things aren’t so urgent.
  3. I can fall in love at all ages.
  4. Life constantly changes – be open!
  5. It takes judgement to realize the possibilities life holds.
  6. We’re happier if we count our blessings.
  7. Our lives become more dimensional with years.
  8. Love is huge!
  9. We all must take responsibility for ourselves and our actions.
  10. . Life comes together in a natural and beautiful way.”

I read her list of life lessons back to her – choking up more than once in the process of doing so. Such wisdom! Such articulation!

“I want to be you when I grow up,” I told her. “I hope I can learn and internalize those lessons as beautifully as you have done.”

Carol and I hugged – and as I left her, she called after me, “It all comes down to living fully every day.”

May you, my dear blogging friends, live fully every day, too. Reach out to a loved one and ask, “What have you learned as you’ve grown older?” Their answers may surprise you.

Share one of your life lessons with me today.

Follow Me


DA1CD509-A1D5-4C43-95BC-5FB717E7597B

Follow Me

Follow me, little one –

I will not lead you astray.

Follow me, innocent one –

I’ll follow you someday.

While you are young

And growing more each day,

Let me guide your footsteps

In a safe and thoughtful way.

When you face some crossroads

And wonder where to turn,

Let me help you choose, and

Let me help you learn.

Soon enough you’ll find me

Needing help, seeking your advice.

But for now, follow me, my love –

Your company feels so nice!

Make Work Play


This month’s copy of HealthMonitor Magazine had a special focus on Senior Health. In it, Diane Keaton shared some tips for aging gracefully. Make work play, the phrase she quoted from a former piano teacher, resonated with me. As I sit at the hospital reception desk, working my weekly volunteer shift, I realize, this is fun!

As I grow older, one of the benefits I am experiencing is that I get to choose how and when I “work.” It’s really all play, because it’s what I choose to do to use my time constructively. But, as I look back at my career in education, I remember feeling like each day in the classroom with my students also was play. I was doing what I loved! I think that’s one of the keys to living happy days, don’t you?

One of my colleagues, Jerry, seemed not only to always make each work day a play day, but his joy was infectious. I used to wonder if he got tired of laughing all the time, being the one that everyone looked to for funniness. Do you know people like that?  Here in my place of retirement I have a friend whose laugh is infectious the way Jerry’s was. She finds joy in living – joy in places others might find a reason to grumble. Being around her makes life fun, makes work play. Do you have the privilege of knowing someone like that?

Diane Keaton cited in her list of tips for aging gracefully a new study published in the Archives of General Psychiatry. She shared that researchers “found that people who had a strong sense of purpose in life experienced a 30% slower rate of mental decline compared to those who had less purpose.” Work that is joyful, work that makes us smile, work that is meaningful often seems more like play than a job. It adds purpose to our lives – and at the same time it infects those around us with the joy we radiate. So, when I retired, I didn’t stop working. I just found a different kind of work. Volunteer activities that use my skills, provide encouragement to others, and share the joy of living constitute work that’s play. They help me age gracefully.

Go to HealthMonitor.com and see the entire article. Look at Diane’s other tips. I love the fact that she embraces aging with vim and vigor. She says, “I love life!” I do, too. What tips might you add to her suggestions?

Tag Cloud