Loving One Another

Posts tagged ‘war’

Let Him Out!


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Let Him Out!

There are days
And then there are
Advent Days.

Days of Waiting –
Days of Unknowing –
Days of Sorrow.

Your life feels
Oppressive.
Hope eludes you.

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This Christmas Eve
Let’s recall
Mary’s waiting.

Let’s remember
Mary’s sweet song –
Her ready acceptance.

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Thousands of years
Later, we need
Her true faith.

Wouldn’t it be
Super great if
All news was good?

Wouldn’t we love
All suffering
To instantly cease?

What joy if
All war and hunger
Were eliminated now!

We’d like God
To bring us
The Promised Peace.

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But, His Way
Is not our way.
His definitions differ.

We look at basics
With greedy eyes.
We look for Plenty.

God defines PLENTY
In heart-felt ways.
He needs “Let Out!”

So, open your heart.
Invite God out
Through your heart.

See your PLENTY
Through God’s eyes.
Focus on others.

Like Mary, sing of
God’s grace, and
Birth His Light.

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God bless you!
Merry Christmas Eve.
Follow that star!!

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What’s Your Image of Afghanistan?


Last night Bob & I attended a documentary at the Emerson Theater in Bozeman, MT. The topic: “Angels Are Made of Light.”

What is your perception of the people of Afghanistan?

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Before the documentary, our response to that question was, “War-torn, depressed, aggressive, beaten-down, varied, down-trodden and fearful.”

 

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After seeing the documentary, our response is, “Resourceful, hopeful in the midst of what might look hopeless, tenacious, clean, basically healthy looking, and respectful of their elders.”

The newspaper review that prompted us to attend was glowing. We met Jason, the reviewer last night. Sorry I didn’t catch his last name. The newspaper page we have doesn’t list it. I’ll edit this and include it when I find out, because I will quote him:

“It is not a complete and objective telling of the country’s history, but rather a series of powerful semblances from those who lived through it. The imagery is vivid, and the contrast between the historic images of the city (Kabul), in times of greater prosperity, and those of the present day are stark reminders of how much the country has changed.”

Jason’s review hooked us in when he wrote, “The cinematography is simply exceptional. Langley is a true craftsman, and he works brilliantly with natural light.”

We were intrigued by the opportunity to  “linger up close with the film’s subjects for long moments… ”  The concentration of subjects was on the school children – – – especially a group of Afghani boys of about 10 -14 years of age. We wanted to “feel their breathing, see them thinking, working, watching the world go by.” And we did!

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“Over the course of the film,” Jason, the reviewer promised we would “accompany the students through lessons in history, poetry, social studies, and math.” And we did!

He wrote, “In the end, the film itself is a lesson in humanity, found right there, on the streets, in broad daylight.” And it was!

The documentary promised to “narrow the gap in our minds between us and them.” And it did!

It was indeed eye-opening.

We all are God’s children. Let’s do whatever we can to:

JUST LOVE ONE ANOTHER!

It begins with trying to understand one another. Set aside those prior perceptions, and get the real picture! I’m grateful for “Angels Are Made of Light” and the Bozeman Doc Series for bringing documentaries such as this one to our community.

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We Can’t Resist Change


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We can’t resist change;
It doesn’t do any good.
It’ll come atcha anyway,
Just as you knew it would.

You can’t live in static constancy.
You can’t love feeling quite STUCK.
You might as well embrace change;
You’ll never survive in muck!

They say the sixties were
A time of enormous flux.
We’re hearing all about it now
From dirt poor to those with bucks.

The media has a lot to say.
Everybody’s weighing in.
John McCain survived the sixties,
And so did Aretha Franklin.

Their lives were celebrated
This week in national news.
Reporters say they rode the waves,
Caused ’em, managed ’em, changed our views.

They figured out how to live
With changes big and small.
But they were not the only ones.
Some of us pions answered the call.

We heard the words of MLK;
We felt the passion, took the power
To remain relevant in the fight
To right the wrongs we saw each hour.

Our lives may not have impacted
As many others as the famous,
But live the changes, that we did.
Saw death and destruction that would shame us.

Assassinations, wars, impeachments,
Protests, Missile Crisis, and debates
All were part of the Sixties decade.
But it also had some greats.

The Voting Rights Act was established;
Medicare brought health care to the masses;
Shirley Chisholm was elected;
Elvis’ army career quietly passes.

“The Pill” was born for married only;
First artificial heart was implanted;
The Vatican II held its four sessions;
The Beatles on Sullivan’s show was granted.

Star Trek debuted in a television series,
Rolling Stone magazine premiered;
“One Small Step for Mankind,”
Cronkite narrated as the moon appeared.

The first e-mail message was sent
On October 29 of 1969;
And the rest is history – changes fast –
Don’t resist it. Change is fine!

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